About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
FBC 5
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
KQEH (PBS) 2
CNNW 1
CSPAN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
MSNBCW 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
referendum tomorrow. it will take some time for that would support for president mohammed morsi we be judgment for what constitution should look like. will he prevail? will he come at the end of the process, process the powers that he claimed for himself two years ago, of which he has since relinquished? >> unfortunately, my answer is going to be yes. one is saying that we need to reject the referendum, the other part is saying no, we want to boycott. so now they are divided. the result is going to be the muslim brotherhood and president morsi is most likely going to win the referendum. on the other hand, the opposition is very strong in egypt. there is no return to the previous situation. what i suggest in the future is that mohammed morsi will win the referendum, try tooit establish an islamic state, he will see strong opposition for months and months. lou: moving quickly to syria as we wrap up. russia today -- from the deputy foreign minister, basically saying that they have acknowledged that bashar al-assad has been losing power and that his departure is a foregone conclusion.
by some demonstration, protesting the mohammed video, getting out of control. a lot of people in congress have said the mohammed video story was a cover-up. i actually hope for the good of the country that is true because at least it would demonstrate that the president understood reality. he was trying to sweep it aside. i'm worried that the ideology that controls the white house and presumably the state department which we're going to see four more years of, leaves us dangerously unprepared to meet the threats that we see from al qaeda, from other terrorist groups in the middle east and around the world. gregg: what do you think john kerry brings to the table? >> well, he certainly has a lot of experience, although a lot of it has been badly, bad judgment in a range of issues. he has been soft on the iranian nuclear weapons program. he has been soft on the north korean nuclear weapons program. he has been soft on russian desires to recreate russian hogeminy in the former soviet union. he has been soft on china's territorial demand in the south china sea. i could go on. i think he will f
turned out to bury mohammed hilal, to mourn the loss of a 22-year-old student who gave out polio vaccine in his spare time. but they also came to express public outrage at this week's murders. nine young people, six of them women, one just 17, have been gunned down since monday, and not at random. a series of coordinated assassinations targeting an annual three day polio vaccination campaign. >> ( translated ): we go out door to door and risk our lives to save innocent children from being permanently handicapped. for what? so that our coming generations turn out to be healthy. we work for our country and we are being rewarded in the form of death. what kind of justice is this? why are we targeted and killed? >> reporter: until someone claims responsibility, we won't know why. the taliban haven't come forward, but extreme islamist groups have long opposed western health interventions and the role for women in campaigns. frustration is compounded by the fact they were making such good progress. there were just 56 cases of polio in pakistan this year, the lowest ever. up until the 1950s, po
vote. this is a constitution that's divided this new democracy, favored by mohammed morsi and the muslims defenders say it's needed to gain the protection. next saturday's voting will happen in the rural areas of the country, favorable to the conservative islamist party. so at this point it seems this constitution's going to happen. there are a chances for the opposition to modify it after the fact but that's difficult. the new constitution also means there will be a new parliament voted in but islamists on that side are well organized. the fear is that the opponents, the critics, will again have to take it to the streets. >> all right, so potentially the violence and demonstrations may not end. >>> as you heard greg report, the islamist predicted to score a victory in the weekend vote. what does it mean for egypt's future, the role of morsi and the potential of a islamist state in egypt. john bolton jones us about every sunday at this time. good morning, embassador. >> good morning. >> the new constitution says islam is the official religion of the state. what other impac
earths and opponents much egyptian president mohammed morsi staging massive rallies one day before voting on a draft constitution that has plunged the count are country into a political hotbed. here is the scene. >> reporter: we are on the eave of that crucial vote. this is what it's all b. this is a copy of the draft constitution. it is 63-pages long, 256 articles and it is causing a lot of problems, including in the egyptian city today of alexandria. protestors for and against president mohammed morsi and the constitution clashing in the streets after a cleric urged a yes vote at friday prayers, he's not supposed to do that. rocks were torn, cars were torched, there were injuries and arrests. so far in cairo it has been quiet. the muslim brotherhood, promorsi forces gathering in one location in fairly big numbers. also behind us here in tahrir square and in the presidential palace the critics of the constitution and president mohammed morsi also gathering. so far the two sides have stayed apart. alisyn: is there anyway to proceed ticket what will happe predict what will happen this week
marketplace, 60-year-old pensioner mohamed taha bemoaned the upheaval that has kept tourists and business away. >> ( translated ): we want life to go on. it doesn't matter if people say yes to constitution or say no. >> warner: but samer shehata says it may be hard for egypt to move on after the vote. if this referendum is adopted, is approved as expected, where does that leave egyptian society? >> it produces a very divided, polarized egyptian society, one in which many of those liberal secular voices will feel that the constitution is an illegitimate document, and that certainly is not healthy for democratic consolidation in egypt. >> warner: for an egypt still waiting for the promise of the revolution to be fulfilled in its citizens' daily lives, that would be a bleak prospect indeed. we asked two experts to weigh in on the discontent in egypt. read their responses on "the rundown." >> woodruff: again, the major developments of the day: a gunman walked into an elementary school in newtown, connecticut and killed 26 people, including 20 children. the killer then committed suicide. it was the
constitution. demonstrations raged on against mohammed morsi. opponents claim he tried to make himself a dictator by granting himself near absolute power. over the weekend, voters passed the new constitution with 57% of the ballot. if passed if an upcoming vote, his ally also have sweeping new powers. protesters claim the vote was full of irregularities. they are demanding the president step down and the constitution be rewritten. >>> i'm john scott in for shepard smith. this is the fox report. the mother of the shooter in friday's school massacre knew her son had problems. so much so she didn't like to leave him alone. that from a marriage counselor who dealt with the mother's divorce. her account is just another piece of the troubling puzzle that is starting to take shape. according to the reporting of cbs news a man who baby sat the shoot service a teen-ager says nancy lanza once warned him not to turn his back on her son for a moment. not even to go to the bathroom. as we've been reporting, family friends described the 20-year-old as a socially awkward loner. they say he suffered f
that constitution and the way it was written by supporters of president mohamed morsi rallied last night. they're angry about accusations of ballot fraud in last saturday's first round of voting. 56% supported the new constitution last week. the second round of voting is this coming saturday. >>> and a major new development in the terror plot we told you about a few weeks ago. a 20-year-old man from south florida, a naturalized citizen from pakistan, charged with plotting to carry out terror attacks here in new york city. we learned that he came to manhattan on november 23rd specifically studying times square, wall street, and broadway theaters. >>> the nra says it's willing to offer meaningful contributions to ensure shootings like those in newtown never happen again. the gun rights group said it had been silent until now out of respect for the families. a major investment firm announced it's selling the biggest maker of the assault rifle. people see it as a step toward making assault rifles tabu. >> at the end of the day it's not necessarily the dollar that counts but the sense. the sense of
up with the story that the terrorist attack was somehow connected to the mohammed video? in a way i think susan rice's withdrawal of her secretary of state candidacy really clears a way potential obstacle. now there is no talk about racism or sexism. now we can get to the point the president himself asked for, what did he do wrong? what did his administration do wrong that led to four americans being murdered? so i think it's important to proceed down that road, perhaps starting next week with secretary of state hillary clinton's testimony up on the hill. jon: that is going to be fascinating to watch. ambassador bolton, good to have you on. thank you. >> thank you. jenna: we'll get back to the school shooting in connecticut. we're just learning more information on what happened this morning. harris, you have more for us in the newsroom. >> reporter: let's catch everybody up in case they're just tuning in, jenna. this is newtown, connecticut. the sandy hook elementary school reported a shooting hour and a half ago. state police in connecticut are assisting local police here in the ar
supporters of president mohammed morsi, the muslim brotherhood, camed -- claimed victory in the first round of voting on morsi's draft constitution. this took place over the weekend. greg palkot streaming live from key owe egypt. greg? >> reporter: hey, jon, yeah. folks are a little bit on edge off voting over the weekend on the draft constitution. the results were closer than expected. the yes votes were 57%. no, 43%. the turnout was lower than usual. according to the opposition the vote was marched by maured by widespread irregularitis. opposition attacking opposition headquarters here in cairo. all that is prompting again by government critics who called for more protests on tuesday, in front. presidential palace in tahrir square behind me and up to the u.s. embassy. this is up to the second and final round of voting in rural areas of egypt on saturday for the constitution which is favored by egyptian president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood party. critics say it is too islamist. defenders say it is necessary to preserve stability here in this country. analysts are saying they
mohammed resulted in the killing of bin laden? >> it did not, and that's what this study, that intensive study that the intelligence committee just completed thousands of pages and a yearlong study indicate clearly that they found out about the courier from an outside source that was outside the country. there is no information whatsoever that shows that. in fact, there's information that they misled the interrogators while this violation of the geneva conventions torturing people was going on. and they -- again, moral of the story is, if you inflict enough pain on someone, they will tell you anything they think that will make the pain stop. and that's what was happening in these interrogations, and it did not lead to eliminating osama bin laden, which a goal we all shared. and to tell the american people it did, i think, is really harmful. >> let me button it up with this, senator. with so many problems and issues on the plate of the senate right now, the attack on benghazi as we were just talking -- the consulate in benghazi, the fiscal cliff, what to do with syria just to name a few,
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
president mohammed morsi's allegiances are as uncertain as his grip on power. under a foreign aid deal signed in 2010, when morsi's u.s. friendly predecessor hosni mubarak was in charge, the u.s. is giving the -- we're giving the plains to egypt -- the planes to egypt's air force. which already has more than 200 of the aircraft. the first four jets are to be delivered beginning january 22, a source at the naval air base in fort worth where the planes had been undergoing testing told foxnews.com. but the $213 million gift is raising questions on capitol hill. morsi is under fire for. the article gos on, buchanan, who recently called for ening foreign aid to egypt altogether said the muslim brother-backed morsi government has been sending increasingly troubled messages, or signals, to washington and giving it state of the art fighter jets is a dangerous idea. he's quoted as saying, american tax dollars must not be used to aid and abet any dictatorial regime that stands with terrorists. representative thornberry of texas, vice chairman of the armed services committee said eyipt is a wild
demonstration as a result of outrage about a video that attacked the prophet mohammed. none of that was true. it was labeled a terrorist attack from day one. but the administration wanted to paint a narrative that everything was fine in libya. so now we have yet another attempt to purposely misdirect the american public. why? because the spokeswoman for the state department said the secretary has accepted the resignation of eric boswell, a high level security official, she's accepted his resignation and then she said, and the other three individuals, who are mentioned in the benghazi report, have been relieved of their current duties. it gave everyone the impression that four individuals had resigned as a result of their mismanagement of this terrorist attack in benghazi, when in fact, we now find out that all of them are still on the payroll, one of them has resigned from his position as deputy secretary, but he's got a lot of other titles as well. so they just shifted the deck chairs and they want to make the american people believe that the state department has held people accountable for
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)